from small one page howto to huge articles all in one place
 

search text in:





Poll
Which filesystem do you use?






poll results

Last additions:
using iotop to find disk usage hogs

using iotop to find disk usage hogs

words:

887

views:

103548

userrating:

average rating: 1.7 (85 votes) (1=very good 6=terrible)


May 25th. 2007:
Words

486

Views

218206

why adblockers are bad


Workaround and fixes for the current Core Dump Handling vulnerability affected kernels

Workaround and fixes for the current Core Dump Handling vulnerability affected kernels

words:

161

views:

98819

userrating:

average rating: 1.3 (28 votes) (1=very good 6=terrible)


April, 26th. 2006:

Druckversion
You are here: manpages





mlocate.db

Section: File Formats (5)
Updated: Jan 2007
Index Return to Main Contents

 

NAME

mlocate.db - a mlocate database

 

DESCRIPTION

A mlocate database starts with a file header: 8 bytes for a magic number ("\0mlocate" like a C literal), 4 bytes for the configuration block size in big endian, 1 byte for file format version (0), 1 byte for the ``require visibility'' flag (0 or 1), 2 bytes padding, and a NUL-terminated path name of the root of the database.

The header is followed by a configuration block, included to ensure databases are not reused if some configuration changes could affect their contents. The size of the configuration block in bytes is stored in the file header. The configuration block is a sequence of variable assignments, ordered by variable name. Each variable assignment consists of a NUL-terminated variable name and an ordered list of NUL-terminated values. The value list is terminated by one more NUL character. The ordering used is defined by the strcmp () function.

Currently defined variables are:

prune_bind_mounts
A single entry, the value of PRUNE_BIND_MOUNTS; one of the strings 0 or 1.

prunefs
The value of PRUNEFS, each entry is converted to uppercase.

prunepaths
The value of PRUNEPATHS.

The rest of the file until EOF describes directories and their contents. Each directory starts with a header: 8 bytes for directory time (seconds) in big endian, 4 bytes for directory time (nanoseconds) in big endian (0 if unknown, less than 1,000,000,000), 4 bytes padding, and a NUL-terminated path name of the the directory. Directory contents, a sequence of file entries sorted by name, follow.

Directory time is the maximum of st_ctime and st_mtime of the directory. updatedb(8) uses the original data if the directory time in the database and in the file system match exactly. Directory time equal to 0 always causes rescanning of the directory: this is necessary to handle directories which were being updated while building the database.

Each file entry starts with a single byte, marking its type:

0
A non-directory file. Followed by a NUL-terminated file (not path) name.

1
A subdirectory. Followed by a NUL-terminated file (not path) name.

2
Marks the end of the current directory.

locate(1) only reports file entries, directory names are not reported because they are reported as an entry in their parent directory. The only exception is the root directory of the database, which is stored in the file header.

 

AUTHOR

Miloslav Trmac <mitr@redhat.com>

 

SEE ALSO

locate(1), updatedb.conf(5), updatedb(8)


 

Index

NAME
DESCRIPTION
AUTHOR
SEE ALSO


Please read "Why adblockers are bad".



Other free services
toURL.org
Shorten long
URLs to short
links like
http://tourl.org/2
tourl.org
.
Reverse DNS lookup
Find out which hostname(s)
resolve to a
given IP or other hostnames for the server
www.reversednslookup.org
rdf newsfeed | rss newsfeed | Atom newsfeed
- Powered by LeopardCMS - Running on Gentoo -
Copyright 2004-2017 Sascha Nitsch Unternehmensberatung UG(haftungsbeschränkt)
Valid XHTML1.1 : Valid CSS : buttonmaker
- Level Triple-A Conformance to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 -
- Copyright and legal notices -
Time to create this page: 3.3 ms